The effect of total hip and hip resurfacing arthroplasty on vertical ground reaction force and impulse symmetry during a sit-to-stand task

Caplan, Nick, Stewart, Su, Kashyap, Shankar, Banaszkiewicz, Paul, St Clair Gibson, Alan, Kader, Deiary and Ewen, Alistair (2014) The effect of total hip and hip resurfacing arthroplasty on vertical ground reaction force and impulse symmetry during a sit-to-stand task. Clinical Biomechanics, 29 (10). pp. 1164-1169. ISSN 0268-0033

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2014.09.00...

Abstract

Background - The aim of this study was to determine the influence of total hip arthroplasty and hip resurfacing arthroplasty on limb loading symmetry before, and after, hip reconstruction surgery during a sit-to-stand task.

Methods - Fourteen patients were recruited that were about to receive either a total hip prosthesis (n = 7) or a hip resurfacing prosthesis (n = 7), as well as matched controls. Patients performed a sit-to-stand movement before, 3 months after, and 12 months after surgery. Peak vertical ground reaction force and impulse were measured for each leg, from which ground reaction force and impulse symmetry ratios were calculated.

Findings - Before surgery, hip resurfacing patients showed a small asymmetry which was not different to normal for ground reaction force (0.88(0.28) vs. 1.00(0.11); p = 0.311) or impulse (0.87(0.29) vs. 0.99(0.09); p = 0.324) symmetry ratios. Total hip patients offloaded their affected hip by 30% in terms of impulse symmetry ratio (0.71(0.36) vs. 0.99(0.23); p = 0.018). At 3 months following surgery asymmetries were seen that were different to normal in both hip resurfacing patients for ground reaction force (0.77(0.16); p = 0.007), and total hip patients for ground reaction force (0.70(0.15); p = 0.018) and impulse (0.72(0.16); p = 0.011) symmetry ratios. By 12 months after surgery total hip patients regained a symmetrical loading pattern for both ground reaction force (0.95(0.06); p = 0.676) and impulse (1.00(0.06); p = 0.702) symmetry ratios. Hip resurfacing patients, however, performed the task by overloading their operated hip, with impulse symmetry ratio being larger than normal (1.16(0.16); p = 0.035).

Interpretation - Physiotherapists should appreciate the need for early recovery of limb loading symmetry as well as subsequent differences in the responses observed with different prostheses.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Hip, replacement, arthroplasty, resurfacing, loading, osteoarthritis, symmetry
Subjects: B100 Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Becky Skoyles
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2014 08:44
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2017 11:41
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/17735

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