Psychophysiological responses in experienced firefighters undertaking repeated self-contained breathing apparatus tasks

Young, Paul, St Clair Gibson, Alan, Partington, Elizabeth, Partington, Sarah and Wetherell, Mark (2014) Psychophysiological responses in experienced firefighters undertaking repeated self-contained breathing apparatus tasks. Ergonomics, 57 (12). pp. 1898-1906. ISSN 1366-5847

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2014.945490

Abstract

In order to safely and effectively extinguish fires and rescue life, firefighters are required to routinely wear self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), yet little is known about the specific physiological and psychological demands associated with repeated exposure to tasks that require SCBA. A total of 12 experienced firefighters took part in a series of commonly encountered SCBA activities: free search, guideline search and live firefighting tasks under room temperature (∼20°C) and extreme heat (∼180°C) conditions to assess changes in heart rate, blood pressure, mood, perceived workload and air usage. Findings demonstrate that live firefighting is associated with greater perceived exhaustion than free search or guideline exercises; however, all tasks lead to high cardiovascular demand regardless of the presence of heat. No significant impact of task upon mood and no significant differences between the perceived demands of guideline, free search and live firefighting exercises were found. Practitioner Summary: This study considered the physiological and psychological responses of firefighters undertaking SCBA exercises. Although live firefighting is associated with greater perceived exertion, the absence of differences in psychological domains between exercises demonstrates that task demands are not always dependent upon the presence of fire and that all tasks are mentally challenging.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Published online ahead of print.
Uncontrolled Keywords: firefighters, demand, mood, breathing apparatus
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Psychology
Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Ay Okpokam
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2014 14:43
Last Modified: 10 May 2017 17:24
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/18025

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