Battlezone: An examination of the physiological responses, movement demands and reproducibility of small-sided cricket games

Vickery, Will, Dascombe, Ben, Duffield, Rob, Kellett, Aaron and Portus, Marc (2013) Battlezone: An examination of the physiological responses, movement demands and reproducibility of small-sided cricket games. Journal of Sports Sciences, 31 (1). pp. 77-86. ISSN 0264-0414

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2012.720706

Abstract

As cricket training typically involves separate skill and conditioning sessions, this study reported on the movement demands, physiological responses and reproducibility of the demands of small-sided cricket games. Thirteen amateur, male cricket players (age: 22.8 ± 3.5 years, height: 1.78 ± 0.06 m, body mass: 78.6 ± 7.1 kg) completed two sessions of a generic small-sided cricket game, termed Battlezone; consisting of six repeat 8-over bouts. Heart rate and movement demands were continuously recorded, whilst blood lactate concentration and perceived exertion were recorded after each respective bout. Batsmen covered the greatest distance (1147 ± 175 m) and demonstrated the greatest mean movement speed (63 ± 9 m · min−1) during each bout. The majority of time (65−86%) was spent with a heart rate of between 51−85% HRmax and a blood lactate concentration of 1.1−2.0 mmol · L−1. Rating of perceived exertion ranged between 4.2−6.0. Movement demands and physiological responses did not differ between standardised sessions within respective playing positions (P > 0.05). The reliability for the majority of movement demands and physiological responses were moderate to high (CV: 5−17%; ICC: 0.48−1.00) within all playing positions. These results suggest that the physiological responses and movement characteristics of generic small-sided cricket games were consistent between sessions within respective playing positions.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: cricket, small-sided games, movement analysis, heart rate, RPE
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Becky Skoyles
Date Deposited: 10 Apr 2015 09:44
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2017 11:42
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/22032

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