The sociolinguistics of variety identification and categorisation: free classification of varieties of spoken English amongst non-linguist listeners

McKenzie, Robert (2015) The sociolinguistics of variety identification and categorisation: free classification of varieties of spoken English amongst non-linguist listeners. Language Awareness, 24 (2). pp. 150-168. ISSN 0965-8416

[img] Text (This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Language Awareness on 16/04/2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09658416.2014.998232.)
McKenzie_2015_Lang_Awareness.doc - Accepted Version

Download (221kB)
[img]
Preview
Text (This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Language Awareness on 16/04/2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09658416.2014.998232.)
McKenzie_2015_Lang_Awareness.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (170kB) | Preview
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658416.2014.998232#abs...

Abstract

In addition to the examination of non-linguists’ evaluations of different speech varieties, in recent years sociolinguists and sociophoneticians have afforded greater attention towards the ways in which naïve listeners perceive, process, and encode spoken language variation, including the identification of language varieties as regionally or socially localised forms. The present study attempts to extend understanding of non-linguists’ perceptions of linguistic diversity through the investigation of how accurately and consistently UK-born students, resident in the north-east of England, can identify the speaker place of origin of six forms of L1 and L2 English. The results demonstrate that whilst the process of encoding indexical properties to and categorisations of speech stimulus as belonging to a specific language variety is complex, there is a clear tendency amongst informants to initially identify the speech as either native or non-native, most especially through the perception of specific segmental and non-segmental phonological features, before attempting more fine-grained classifications. The findings also point to the recognition of speaker place of origin at different levels of awareness, above and below the level of individual consciousness.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: speech perception, variety identification, explicit vs. implicit processing, dialectal awareness, speech perception, variety identification, explicit vs. implicit processing, dialectal awareness, language awareness, sociolinguistic awareness
Subjects: L700 Human and Social Geography
Q100 Linguistics
Q300 English studies
Department: Faculties > Arts, Design and Social Sciences > School of Arts and Social Sciences > Humanities
Depositing User: Robert Mckenzie
Date Deposited: 15 May 2015 08:31
Last Modified: 13 May 2017 07:27
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/22475

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics


Policies: NRL Policies | NRL University Deposit Policy | NRL Deposit Licence