An algorithm that delivers an individualized rapid-acting insulin dose after morning resistance exercise counters post-exercise hyperglycaemia in type 1 diabetes patients: a randomized pilot study

Turner, Daniel, Walker, Mark, Luzio, Stephen, Bain, Stephen, Richards, A., Rhydderch, Danielle, Martin, R., Kilduff, Liam, Campbell, Matthew, West, Dan and Bracken, Richard (2016) An algorithm that delivers an individualized rapid-acting insulin dose after morning resistance exercise counters post-exercise hyperglycaemia in type 1 diabetes patients: a randomized pilot study. Diabetic Medicine, 33 (4). pp. 506-510. ISSN 1464-5491

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.12870

Abstract

Aims - To develop an algorithm that delivers an individualized dose of rapid-acting insulin after morning resistance exercise to counter post-exercise hyperglycaemia in individuals with Type 1 diabetes.

Methods - Eight people with Type 1 diabetes, aged 34 ± 7 years with HbA1c concentrations 72 ± 12 mmol/mol (8.7 ± 1.1%), attended our laboratory on two separate mornings after fasting, having taken their usual basal insulin the previous evening. These people performed a resistance exercise session comprising six exercises for two sets of 10 repetitions at 60% of the maximum amount of force that was generated in one maximal contraction (60% 1RM). In a randomized and counterbalanced order, the participants were administered an individualized dose of rapid-acting insulin (2 ± 1 units, range 0–4 units) immediately after resistance exercise (insulin session) by means of an algorithm or were not administered this (no-insulin session). Venous blood glucose concentrations were measured for 125 min after resistance exercise. Data (mean ± sem values) were analysed using anova (P ≤ 0.05).

Results - Participants had immediate post-resistance exercise hyperglycaemia (insulin session 13.0 ± 1.6 vs. no-insulin session 12.7 ± 1.5 mmol/l; P = 0.834). The decline in blood glucose concentration between peak and 125 min after exercise was greater in the insulin exercise session than in the no-insulin session (3.3 ± 1.0 vs. 1.3 ± 0.4 mmol/l: P = 0.015). There were no episodes of hypoglycaemia (blood glucose <3.9 mmol/l).

Conclusions - Administration of rapid-acting insulin according to an individualized algorithm reduced the hyperglycaemia associated with morning resistance exercise without causing hypoglycaemia in the 2 h post-exercise period in people with Type 1 diabetes.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
B400 Nutrition
C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Ay Okpokam
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2015 13:12
Last Modified: 25 Apr 2016 10:07
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/23349

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