Can Aging in Place Be Cost Effective? A Systematic Review

Quinn, Terence, Graybill, Erin, McMeekin, Peter and Wildman, John (2014) Can Aging in Place Be Cost Effective? A Systematic Review. PLoS ONE, 9 (7). e102705. ISSN 1932-6203

[img]
Preview
Text
journal.pone.0102705.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial 4.0.

Download (244kB) | Preview
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102705

Abstract

Purpose of the Study - To systematically review cost, cost-minimization and cost-effectiveness studies for assisted living technologies (ALTs) that specifically enable older people to ‘age in place’ and highlight what further research is needed to inform decisions regarding aging in place.

Design - People aged 65+ and their live-in carers (where applicable), using an ALT to age in place at home opposed to a community-dwelling arrangement.

Methods - Studies were identified using a predefined search strategy on two key economic and cost evaluation databases NHS EED, HEED. Studies were assessed using methods recommended by the Campbell and Cochrane Economic Methods Group and presented in a narrative synthesis style.

Results - Eight eligible studies were identified from North America spread over a diverse geographical range. The majority of studies reported the ALT intervention group as having lower resource use costs than the control group; though the low methodological quality and heterogeneity of the individual costs and outcomes reported across studies must be considered.

Implications - The studies suggest that in some cases ALTs may reduce costs, though little data were identified and what there were was of poor quality. Methods to capture quality of life gains were not used, therefore potential effects on health and wellbeing may be missed. Further research is required using newer developments such as the capabilities approach. High quality studies assessing the cost-effectiveness of ALTs for ageing in place are required before robust conclusion on their use can be drawn.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: L500 Social Work
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Health, Community and Education Studies > Healthcare
Depositing User: Becky Skoyles
Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2015 14:45
Last Modified: 08 May 2017 19:51
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/23547

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics


Policies: NRL Policies | NRL University Deposit Policy | NRL Deposit Licence