Reducing inequalities in care for patients with non-malignant diseases: Insights from a realist evaluation of an integrated palliative care pathway

Dalkin, Sonia, Lhussier, Monique, Philipson, Pete, Jones, Diana and Cunningham, William (2016) Reducing inequalities in care for patients with non-malignant diseases: Insights from a realist evaluation of an integrated palliative care pathway. Palliative Medicine, 30 (7). pp. 690-697. ISSN 1477-030X

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269216315626352

Abstract

Background:
The need for palliative care is growing internationally with an increasing prevalence of non-malignant diseases. The integrated care pathway was implemented in primary care by multidisciplinary teams from 2009 in a locality in the North East of England. Fourteen general practitioner practices provided data for the study.

Aim:
To find whether, how, and under what circumstances palliative care registrations are made for patients with non-malignant diseases in primary care.

Design:
General practitioner practice data were analysed statistically and qualitative data were collected from health care professionals and members of relevant organisations.

Findings:
A mixed-effects logistic model indicated a significant difference beyond the 0.1% level (p < 0.001) in registrations between the malignant and non-malignant groups in 2011, with an odds ratio of 0.09 (=exp(−2.4266)), indicating that patients in the nonmalignant group are around 11 times (1/0.09) less likely to be registered than patients in the malignant group. However, patients with non-malignant diseases were significantly more likely to be registered in 2012 than in 2011 with an odds ratio of 1.46, significant beyond the 1% level. Qualitative analyses indicate that health care professionals find registering patients with non-malignant diseases stressful, yet feel that their confidence in treating this population is increasing.

Conclusion:
The integrated care pathway began to enable the reduction in inequalities in care by identifying, registering and managing an increasing number of palliative patients with non-malignant diseases. Consensual and inclusive definitions of palliative care were developed in order to legitimise the registration of such patients.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Palliative care, cancer, non-cancer, realist evaluation, malignant, non-malignant
Subjects: B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
Department: Faculties > Engineering and Environment > Mathematics and Information Sciences
Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Health, Community and Education Studies > Public Health and Wellbeing
Depositing User: Pete Philipson
Date Deposited: 28 Jan 2016 14:13
Last Modified: 10 May 2017 05:34
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/25744

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