Revisiting usability's three key principles

Cockton, Gilbert (2008) Revisiting usability's three key principles. In: Proceeding of the twenty-sixth annual CHI conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems - CHI '08. ACM, New York, pp. 2473-2484. ISBN 9781605580128

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1358628.1358704

Abstract

The foundations of much HCI research and practice were elaborated over 20 years ago as three key principles by Gould and Lewis [7]: early focus on users and tasks; empirical measurement; and iterative design. Close reading of this seminal paper and subsequent versions indicates that these principles evolved, and that success in establishing them within software development involved a heady mix of power and destiny. As HCI's fourth decade approaches, we re-examine the origins and status of Gould and Lewis' principles, and argue that is time to move on, not least because the role of the principles in reported case studies is unconvincing. Few, if any, examples of successful application of the first or second principles are offered, and examples of the third tell us little about the nature of successful iteration. More credible, better grounded and more appropriate principles are needed. We need not so much to start again, but to start for the first time, and argue from first principles for apt principles for designing.

Item Type: Book Section
Subjects: G900 Others in Mathematical and Computing Sciences
W200 Design studies
Department: Faculties > Arts, Design and Social Sciences > Design
Depositing User: Ay Okpokam
Date Deposited: 29 Feb 2016 15:14
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2017 17:06
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/26184

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