Differentiation of neotropical ecosystems by modern soil phytolith assemblages and its implications for palaeoenvironmental and archaeological reconstructions II: Southwestern Amazonian forests

Watling, Jennifer, Iriarte, José, Whitney, Bronwen, Consuelo, E., Mayle, Francis, Castro, Wendeson, Schaan, Denise P. and Feldpausch, Ted (2016) Differentiation of neotropical ecosystems by modern soil phytolith assemblages and its implications for palaeoenvironmental and archaeological reconstructions II: Southwestern Amazonian forests. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 226. pp. 30-43. ISSN 0034-6667

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.revpalbo.2015.12.002

Abstract

Accurate archaeological and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions using phytoliths relies on the study of modern reference material. In eastern Acre, Brazil, we examined whether the five most common forest types present today were able to be differentiated by their soil phytolith assemblages, and thus provide analogues with which to compare palaeoecological assemblages from pre-Columbian earthwork sites in the region. Surface soils and vegetation from dense humid evergreen forest, dense humid evergreen forest with high palm abundance, palm forest, bamboo forest and fluvial forest were sampled and their phytoliths analysed. Relative phytolith frequencies were statistically compared using Principal Components Analyses (PCAs). We found the major differences in species composition to be well-represented by the phytolith assemblages as all forest types, apart from the two sub-types of dense humid evergreen forest, could be differentiated. Larger phytoliths from the sand fraction were found to be more ecologically diagnostic than those from the silt fraction. The surface soil phytolith assemblages we analysed can therefore be used as analogues to improve the accuracy of archaeological and palaeoecological reconstructions in the region.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Phytoliths; Palaeoecology; Archaeology; Southwest Amazonia
Subjects: F400 Forensic and Archaeological Science
F800 Physical and Terrestrial Geographical and Environmental Sciences
Department: Faculties > Engineering and Environment > Geography and Environmental Sciences
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 29 Mar 2016 09:33
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2016 11:31
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/26452

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