Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females

Hicks, Kirsty, Onambele-Pearson, Gladys, Winwood, Keith and Morse, Christopher (2016) Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females. PLOS ONE, 11 (3). e0150848. ISSN 1932-6203

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150848

Abstract

Aim:
To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage.

Materials and Method:
Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20–90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage.

Results:
Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (p<0.05). There was no sex difference in isometric torque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (p<0.05), and remained higher when maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (p<0.05).

Conclusion:
Based on isometric torque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 25 Apr 2016 10:53
Last Modified: 13 May 2017 03:00
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/26634

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