Sexual selection on male vocal fundamental frequency in humans and other anthropoids

Puts, David, Hill, Alexander, Bailey, Drew, Walker, Robert, Rendall, Drew, Wheatley, John, Welling, Lisa, Dawood, Khytam, Cárdenas, Rodrigo, Burriss, Robert, Jablonski, Nina, Shriver, Mark, Weiss, Daniel, Lameira, Adriano, Apicella, Coren, Owren, Michael, Barelli, Claudia, Glenn, Mary and Ramos-Fernandez, Gabriel (2016) Sexual selection on male vocal fundamental frequency in humans and other anthropoids. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 283 (1829). p. 20152830. ISSN 0962-8452

[img] Text (Article)
Puts - F0 & Sexual Selection Proc B r3 for Rob.docx - Accepted Version

Download (118kB)
[img]
Preview
Text (Article)
Puts - F0 & Sexual Selection Proc B r3 for Rob.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (199kB) | Preview
[img] Text
Supplementary Material r4.docx - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (1MB)
[img] Text
Table 1.docx - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (17kB)
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2015.2830

Abstract

In many primates, including humans, the vocalizations of males and females differ dramatically, with male vocalizations and vocal anatomy often seeming to exaggerate apparent body size. These traits may be favoured by sexual selection because low-frequency male vocalizations intimidate rivals and/or attract females, but this hypothesis has not been systematically tested across primates, nor is it clear why competitors and potential mates should attend to vocalization frequencies. Here we show across anthropoids that sexual dimorphism in fundamental frequency (F0) increased during evolutionary transitions towards polygyny, and decreased during transitions towards monogamy. Surprisingly, humans exhibit greater F0 sexual dimorphism than any other ape. We also show that low-F0 vocalizations predict perceptions of men's dominance and attractiveness, and predict hormone profiles (low cortisol and high testosterone) related to immune function. These results suggest that low male F0 signals condition to competitors and mates, and evolved in male anthropoids in response to the intensity of mating competition.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: sexual selection, anthropoid, primates, mating system, vocal fundamental frequency, dominance, attractiveness
Subjects: C100 Biology
C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Becky Skoyles
Date Deposited: 16 May 2016 11:53
Last Modified: 26 Oct 2017 11:23
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/26800

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics


Policies: NRL Policies | NRL University Deposit Policy | NRL Deposit Licence