Relationships Among Cognitive Function and Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Older Heart Failure Patients

Kure, Christina, Rosenfeldt, Franklin, Scholey, Andrew, Pipingas, Andrew, Kaye, David, Bergin, Peter, Croft, Kevin, Wesnes, Keith, Myers, Stephen and Stough, Con (2016) Relationships Among Cognitive Function and Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Older Heart Failure Patients. Journal of Cardiac Failure, 22 (7). pp. 548-559. ISSN 1071-9164

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cardfail.2016.03.006

Abstract

Background:
The mechanisms for cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) are unclear. We investigated the relative contributions of cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV), oxidative stress, and inflammation to HF-associated cognitive impairment.

Methods and Results:
Thirty-six HF patients (≥60 years) and 40 healthy controls (68 ± 7 vs 67 ± 5 years, P > .05; 69% vs 50% male, P > .05) completed the Cognitive Drug Research computerized assessment battery and Stroop tasks. Common carotid (CCA) and middle cerebral arterial BFV were obtained by transcranial Doppler. Blood samples were collected for oxidant (diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites; F2-isoprostanes), antioxidant (coenzyme Q10; CoQ10), and inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein). Compared with controls, patients exhibited impaired attention (Cognitive Drug Research's Power of Attention domain, congruent Stroop) and executive function (incongruent Stroop). Multiple regression modeling showed that CCA-BFV and CoQ10 but not group predicted performance on attention and executive function. Additionally, in HF patients, CCA-BFV and CoQ10 (β = −0.34 vs β = −0.35) were significant predictors of attention, and CCA-BFV (β = −0.34) was a predictor of executive function.

Conclusions:
Power of Attention and executive function is impaired in older HF patients, and reduced CCA-BFV and CoQ10 are associated with worse cognition. Interventions addressing these mechanisms may improve cognition in older HF patients.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Heart failure; cognition, oxidative stress; antioxidants; inflammation; blood flow velocity
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Becky Skoyles
Date Deposited: 16 May 2016 10:23
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2016 11:49
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/26817

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