Coconut water does not improve markers of hydration during sub-maximal exercise and performance in a subsequent time trial compared to water alone

Peart, Daniel, Hensby, Andy and Shaw, Matthew (2017) Coconut water does not improve markers of hydration during sub-maximal exercise and performance in a subsequent time trial compared to water alone. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 27 (3). pp. 179-184. ISSN 1526-484X

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ACCEPTED Coconut water does not improve markers of hydration during sub-maximal exercise and performance in a subsequent time trial compared to water alone.docx - Accepted Version

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2016-0121

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare markers of hydration during sub-maximal exercise and subsequent time trial performance when consuming water (PW) or coconut water (CW). There was also a secondary aim to assess the palatability of CW during exercise and voluntary intake during intense exercise. 10 males (age 27.9 + 4.9 years, body mass 78.1 + 10.1kg, average max minute power 300.2 + 28.2W) completed 60-min of sub-maximal cycling followed by a 10-km time trial on two occasions. During these trials participants consumed either PW or CW in a randomised manner, drinking a 250 ml of the assigned drink between 10-15 min, 25-30 min and 40-45 min, and then drinking ad libitum from 55-min until the end of the time trial. Body mass and urine osmolality were recorded pre-exercise and then after 30-min, 60-min, and post time trial. Blood glucose, lactate, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion (RPE; 6-20) and ratings of thirst, sweetness, nausea, fullness and stomach upset (1 =very low/none, 5= very high) were recorded during each drink period. CW did not significantly improve time trial performance compared to PW (971.4 ± 50.5 and 966.6 ± 44.8 seconds respectively; P=0.698) and there was also no significant differences between trials for any of the physiological variables measured. However there were subjective differences between the beverages for taste, resulting in a significantly reduced volume of voluntary intake in the CW trial (115 ± 95.41 ml and 208.7 ± 86.22 ml; p < 0.001).

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Palatability, glucose, urine osmolality, perceived exertion
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Daniel Peart
Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2016 15:17
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2017 15:45
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/28947

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