Facial resemblance between women's partners and brothers

Saxton, Tamsin, Steel, Catherine, Rowley, Katie, Newman, Amy and Baguley, Thom (2017) Facial resemblance between women's partners and brothers. Evolution and Human Behavior, 38 (4). pp. 429-433. ISSN 1090-5138

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2017.04.006

Abstract

Research on optimal outbreeding describes the greater reproductive success experienced on average by couples who are neither too closely related, nor too genetically dissimilar. How is optimal outbreeding achieved? Faces that subtly resemble family members could present useful cues to a potential reproductive partner with an optimal level of genetic dissimilarity. Here, we present the first empirical data that heterosexual women select partners who resemble their brothers. Raters ranked the facial similarity between a woman’s male partner, and that woman’s brother compared to foils. In a multilevel ordinal logistic regression that modeled variability in both the stimuli and the raters, there was clear evidence for perceptual similarity in facial photographs of a woman’s partner and her brother. That is, although siblings themselves are sexually aversive, sibling resemblance is not. The affective responses of disgust and attraction may be calibrated to distinguish close kin from individuals with some genetic dissimilarity during partner choice.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Attraction; Face preferences; Partner choice; Individual differences
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Tamsin Saxton
Date Deposited: 26 Apr 2017 10:51
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2017 09:45
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/30607

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