Is the concept of compulsion useful in the explanation or description of addictive behaviour and experience?

Heather, Nick (2017) Is the concept of compulsion useful in the explanation or description of addictive behaviour and experience? Addictive Behaviors Reports, 6. pp. 15-38. ISSN 2352-8532

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.abrep.2017.05.002

Abstract

The concept of compulsion, in which addictive behaviour is said to be carried out against the will, is central to the disease theory of addiction and ubiquitous in modern definitions. The aims of this article are: (i) to describe various meanings of compulsion in the literature; (ii) to compare the part thought to be played by compulsion in addiction with its suggested role in obsessive-compulsive disorder; (iii) to critically examine the place of compulsion in influential neurobiological accounts of addiction; (iv) to summarise the empirical evidence bearing on the usefulness of the compulsion concept, evidence that seems at first sight incompatible with the notion of compulsion. This is followed by a discussion of which possible meanings of compulsion can survive an empirical test and what role they might play in understanding addiction, paying particular attention to a distinction between strong and weak senses of compulsion. A conclusion is that addictive behaviour cannot be considered compulsive at the time it is carried out, though other possible meanings of compulsion as an explanation or description of addictive behaviour and experience are discussed. Among other conclusions, it is suggested that, although in some senses of the term it may seem arbitrary whether or not ‘compulsion’ should be retained, its use has important consequences for the public understanding of addiction, and is likely to deter people's attempts to overcome their addictions and their chances of success.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Addiction; Compulsion; Disease theory; Neurobiological theories; Voluntary behaviour; Operant behaviour; Public understanding
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Becky Skoyles
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2017 15:26
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2017 05:18
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/31145

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