Lifestyle Behavior Change in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Qualitative Study of Clinical Practice

Avery, Leah, Exley, Catherine, McPherson, Stuart, Trenell, Michael, Anstee, Quentin M. and Hallsworth, Kate (2017) Lifestyle Behavior Change in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Qualitative Study of Clinical Practice. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. ISSN 1542-3565 (In Press)

[img]
Preview
Text (Full text)
Avery et al - Lifestyle Behavior Change in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives 4.0.

Download (97kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.011

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver condition worldwide and is linked largely to obesity and inactivity. Lifestyle modification is the primary treatment for NAFLD targeting dietary change, physical activity, and exercise to facilitate weight loss and weight loss maintenance. This has been shown to reduce steatosis and ameliorate steatohepatitis. European Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of NAFLD highlight the importance of targeting lifestyle behavior change in all patients with NAFLD regardless of disease severity. These guidelines recommend combining dietary restriction and a progressive increase in aerobic exercise and resistance training with a focus on tailoring interventions to the individual patient. Practice guidelines published by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases recommend weight loss of at least 3% to 5% of body weight via hypocaloric diet or diet combined with increased physical activity but state that these lifestyle interventions should target patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Given the benefits of lifestyle behavior change, this study explored the perceptions surrounding clinical care as currently offered to patients with NAFLD. The aim of this study was to establish whether current provision of lifestyle behavior change support is sufficient, whether health care professionals believe they have the tools to target lifestyle behavior changes effectively, and how targeting diet and physical activity/exercise to facilitate weight loss and weight loss maintenance in practice can be improved from the perspective of health care professionals and patients.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Health, Community and Education Studies > Healthcare
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2017 13:49
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2017 15:25
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/31486

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics


Policies: NRL Policies | NRL University Deposit Policy | NRL Deposit Licence