The effect of breathing an ambient low-density, hyperoxic gas on the perceived effort of breathing and maximal exercise performance in well-trained athletes

Ansley, Les, Petersen, David, Thomas, Alan, St Clair Gibson, Alan and Noakes, Timothy (2006) The effect of breathing an ambient low-density, hyperoxic gas on the perceived effort of breathing and maximal exercise performance in well-trained athletes. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 41 (1). pp. 2-7. ISSN 0306-3674

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2006.026989

Abstract

Background: The role of the perception of breathing effort in the regulation of performance of maximal exercise remains unclear.
Aims: To determine whether the perceived effort of ventilation is altered through substituting a less dense gas for normal ambient air and whether this substitution affects performance of maximal incremental exercise in trained athletes.
Methods: Eight highly trained cyclists (mean SD) maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max)?=?69.9 (7.9) (mlO2/kg/min) performed two randomised maximal tests in a hyperbaric chamber breathing ambient air composed of either 35% O2/65% N2 (nitrox) or 35% O2/65% He (heliox). A ramp protocol was used in which power output was incremented at 0.5 W/s. The trials were separated by at least 48 h. The perceived effort of breathing was obtained via Borg Category Ratio Scales at 3-min intervals and at fatigue. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and minute ventilation (VE) were monitored continuously. Results: Breathing heliox did not change the sensation of dyspnoea: there were no differences between trials for the Borg scales at any time point. Exercise performance was not different between the nitrox and heliox trials (peak power output?=?451 (58) and 453 (56) W), nor was VO2max (4.96 (0.61) and 4.88 (0.65) l/min) or maximal VE (157 (24) and 163 (22) l/min). Between-trial variability in peak power output was less than either VO2max or maximal VE. Conclusion: Breathing a less dense gas does not improve maximal performance of exercise or reduce the perception of breathing effort in highly trained athletes, although an attenuated submaximal tidal volume and VE with a concomitant reduction in VO2 suggests an improved gas exchange and reduced O2 cost of ventilation when breathing heliox.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: First author and corresponding author
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Related URLs:
Depositing User: EPrint Services
Date Deposited: 05 Nov 2008 15:05
Last Modified: 08 May 2017 15:07
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/3248

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