Why People Participate in the Sharing Economy: An Empirical Investigation of Uber

Lee, Zach W. Y., Chan, Tommy K. H., Balaji, M. S. and Alain Yee-Loong, Chong (2018) Why People Participate in the Sharing Economy: An Empirical Investigation of Uber. Internet Research, 28 (3). pp. 829-850. ISSN 1066-2243

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1108/IntR-01-2017-0037

Abstract

Purpose - This study aimed at examining the effects of inhibiting, motivating, and technological factors on users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy.

Design/methodology/approach - A self-reported online survey was conducted among Uber users in Hong Kong. A total of 295 valid responses were collected. The research model was empirically tested using the structural equation modeling (SEM) technique.

Findings - The results suggested that perceived risks, perceived benefits, trust in the platform, and perceived platform qualities were significant predictors of users’ intention to participate in Uber.

Research implications - This study bridged the research gaps in the sharing economy literature by examining the effects of perceived risks, perceived benefits, and trust in the platform on users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy. Moreover, this study enriched the extended valence framework by incorporating perceived platform qualities into the research model, responding to the calls for the inclusion of technological variables in information systems research.

Practical implications - The findings provided practitioners with insights into enhancing users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy.

Originality/value - This study presented one of the first attempts to systematically examine the effects of inhibiting, motivating and technological factors on users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Sharing economy, access economy, collaborative consumption, peer-to-peer ridesharing, Uber, extended valence framework
Subjects: G500 Information Systems
Department: Faculties > Business and Law > Newcastle Business School > Business and Management
Depositing User: Tommy Chan
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2018 11:29
Last Modified: 28 Aug 2018 18:45
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/33426

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