Do you see what I see? Mobile eye-tracker contextual analysis and inter-rater reliability

Stuart, Sam, Hunt, David, Nell, Jeremy, Godfrey, Alan, Hausdorff, Jeffrey M., Rochester, Lynn and Alcock, Lisa (2018) Do you see what I see? Mobile eye-tracker contextual analysis and inter-rater reliability. Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing, 56 (2). pp. 289-296. ISSN 0140-0118

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11517-017-1669-z

Abstract

Mobile eye-trackers are currently used during real-world tasks (e.g. gait) to monitor visual and cognitive processes, particularly in ageing and Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, contextual analysis involving fixation locations during such tasks is rarely performed due to its complexity. This study adapted a validated algorithm and developed a classification method to semi-automate contextual analysis of mobile eye-tracking data. We further assessed inter-rater reliability of the proposed classification method. A mobile eye-tracker recorded eye-movements during walking in five healthy older adult controls (HC) and five people with PD. Fixations were identified using a previously validated algorithm, which was adapted to provide still images of fixation locations (n = 116). The fixation location was manually identified by two raters (DH, JN), who classified the locations. Cohen’s kappa correlation coefficients determined the inter-rater reliability. The algorithm successfully provided still images for each fixation, allowing manual contextual analysis to be performed. The inter-rater reliability for classifying the fixation location was high for both PD (kappa = 0.80, 95% agreement) and HC groups (kappa = 0.80, 91% agreement), which indicated a reliable classification method. This study developed a reliable semi-automated contextual analysis method for gait studies in HC and PD. Future studies could adapt this methodology for various gait-related eye-tracking studies.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Eye-tracking, Contextual, Older adults, Parkinson’s disease, Algorithm Inter-rater
Subjects: B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
G400 Computer Science
Department: Faculties > Engineering and Environment > Computer and Information Sciences
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2018 13:17
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2018 13:26
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/34048

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