Specialization training programs for physician assistants: Symbolic violence in the medical field?

Hlavin, Joseph and Callahan, Jamie (2013) Specialization training programs for physician assistants: Symbolic violence in the medical field? Health Sociology Review, 22 (2). pp. 200-209. ISSN 1446-1242

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.5172/hesr.2013.22.2.200

Abstract

Postgraduate physician assistant (PA) programs designed to train individuals for the workplace have existed since the advent of the profession itself. These residency programs continue to grow in number despite the lack of outcome data supporting improvements in PA learning, effects on career development, or improved patient care. Leadership bodies of the PA profession in the US have been at odds regarding the meaning and ramification of postgraduate programs on specialty credentialing, accreditation standards, insurance reimbursement, and employment. Using Bourdieu’s cultural conflict theory as a framework, we analyze the issues confronting postgraduate PA training programs. Our paper discusses implications related to shifts in power amongst the different stakeholders concluding that, although formal postgraduate PA training can be beneficial to both the PA and the medicine, considerations related to underlying agendas need attention.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: job specialty training, credentialing, physician assistants, Bourdieu, sociology
Subjects: B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
Department: Faculties > Business and Law > Newcastle Business School > Business and Management
Depositing User: Becky Skoyles
Date Deposited: 04 May 2018 11:35
Last Modified: 04 May 2018 11:35
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/34169

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