Managing information flow and design processes to reduce design risks in offsite construction projects

Sutrisna, Monty and Goulding, Jack (2019) Managing information flow and design processes to reduce design risks in offsite construction projects. Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, 26 (2). pp. 267-284. ISSN 0969-9988

[img]
Preview
Text
PDF_Proof Sutrisna and Goulding (June 2018).pdf - Accepted Version

Download (503kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1108/ecam-11-2017-0250

Abstract

Purpose: Following the increasing need for faster construction, improved quality and evidence value propositions, offsite construction is increasingly being proffered as a viable contender to “traditional” construction approaches. However, whilst evidence supports the move towards offsite, its uptake has been lower than expected. Whilst the precise reasons for this seem to be influenced by a number of issues, including contextual drivers and market maturity; some project stakeholders also view offsite as carrying greater risks. The purpose of this paper is to report on the quality of information flow, in particular, the impact and influence of this on design risks in offsite construction projects. Design/methodology/approach: An existing design risk framework is used as the point of departure for this research. This is further expanded into a specific model for evaluating offsite construction projects design risks, the rubrics of which were informed by two case studies of offsite construction projects in Australia and the UK analysed with a process-tracing technique. Whilst these cases were geographically separated, the constructs were aligned to uncover fundamental design information requirements and concomitant risks associated with offsite. Findings: The findings of the research reported in this paper include the crucial information feeding into the design process emanating from the lifecycle of offsite construction projects, namely, design, offsite (manufacturing), handling and transporting, site works and installation and also occupancy. These are contextualised within the four categories, namely, client requirements, project requirements, regulation aspects and social aspects and the final outcomes were summarised into a holistic diagram. Originality/value: Given that the offsite construction has shifted the working paradigm into assigning a significant level of efforts and emphasis at the front end of the construction projects, the importance of its design process and hence design risks management has gone up significantly in construction projects delivered using this technique. This research and paper contributes significantly to the built environment domain by identifying the crucial aspects along the project lifecycle to be considered to minimise the potential occurrence of design risks and hence increasing the confidence of project stakeholders in adopting offsite construction techniques in their projects.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Design management, Risk management, Project management, Quality of information, Design risks, Offsite construction
Subjects: K100 Architecture
Department: Faculties > Engineering and Environment > Architecture and Built Environment
Depositing User: Becky Skoyles
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2018 07:39
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2019 07:49
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/34685

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics


Policies: NRL Policies | NRL University Deposit Policy | NRL Deposit Licence