Effectiveness of dietary interventions among adults of retirement age: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Lara Gallegos, Jose, Hobbs, Nicola, Moynihan, Paula, Meyer, Thomas, Adamson, Ashley, Errington, Linda, Rochester, Lynn, Sniehotta, Falko, White, Martin and Mathers, John (2014) Effectiveness of dietary interventions among adults of retirement age: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. BMC Medicine, 12 (1). ISSN 1741-7015

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-12-60

Abstract

Background
Retirement from work involves significant lifestyle changes and may represent an opportunity to promote healthier eating patterns in later life. However, the effectiveness of dietary interventions during this period has not been evaluated.

Methods
We undertook a systematic review of dietary interventions among adults of retirement transition age (54 to 70 years). Twelve electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials evaluating the promotion of a healthy dietary pattern, or its constituent food groups, with three or more months of follow-up and reporting intake of specific food groups. Random-effects models were used to determine the pooled effect sizes. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were used to assess sources of heterogeneity.

Results
Out of 9,048 publications identified, 68 publications reporting 24 studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Twenty-two studies, characterized by predominantly overweight and obese participants, were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, interventions increased fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake by 87.5 g/day (P <0.00001), with similar results in the short-to-medium (that is, 4 to 12 months; 85.6 g/day) and long-term (that is, 13 to 58 months; 87.0 g/day) and for body mass index (BMI) stratification. Interventions produced slightly higher intakes of fruit (mean 54.0 g/day) than of vegetables (mean 44.6 g/day), and significant increases in fish (7 g/day, P = 0.03) and decreases in meat intake (9 g/day, P <0.00001).

Conclusions
Increases in F&V intakes were positively associated with the number of participant intervention contacts. Dietary interventions delivered during the retirement transition are therefore effective, sustainable in the longer term and likely to be of public health significance.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Mediterranean diet, Fruit and vegetables, Retirement, Aging, Randomized controlled trial, Systematic review, Meta-analysis
Subjects: B400 Nutrition
B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Applied Sciences
Depositing User: Ellen Cole
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2018 12:22
Last Modified: 19 Feb 2019 10:30
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/35237

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