Impact of educational interventions on adolescent attitudes and knowledge regarding vaccination: A pilot study

Lee, Albert, Carolan, Kate, Verran, Joanna, Crossley, Matthew, Redfern, James, Whitton, Nicola and Amos, Martyn (2018) Impact of educational interventions on adolescent attitudes and knowledge regarding vaccination: A pilot study. PLoS ONE, 13 (1). e0190984. ISSN 1932-6203

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190984

Abstract

Background:
Current immunisation levels in England currently fall slightly below the threshold recommended by the World Health Organization, and the three-year trend for vaccination uptake is downwards. Attitudes towards vaccination can affect future decisions on whether or not to vaccinate, and this can have significant public health implications. Interventions can impact future vaccination decisions, and these interventions can take several forms. Relatively little work has been reported on the use of vaccination interventions in young people, who form the next generation of individuals likely to make vaccination decisions.

Method:
We investigated the impact of two different types of educational intervention on attitudes towards vaccination in young people in England. A cohort of young people (n = 63) was recruited via a local school. This group was divided into three sub-groups; one (n = 21) received a presentation-based intervention, one (n = 26) received an interactive simulation-based intervention, and the third (n = 16) received no intervention. Participants supplied information on (1) their attitudes towards vaccination, and (2) their information needs and views on personal choice concerning vaccination, at three time points: immediately before and after the intervention, and after six months.

Results:
Neither intervention had a significant effect on participants’ attitudes towards vaccination. However, the group receiving the presentation-based intervention saw a sustained uplift in confidence about information needs, which was not observed in the simulation-based intervention group.

Discussion:
Our findings with young people are consistent with previous work on vaccination interventions aimed at adults, which have shown limited effectiveness, and which can actually reduce intention to vaccinate. Our findings on the most effective mode of delivery for the intervention should inform future discussion in the growing “games for health” domain, which proposes the use of interactive digital resources in healthcare education.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
Department: Faculties > Engineering and Environment > Computer and Information Sciences
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2018 17:06
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2019 17:19
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/35733

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