A community-based intervention (Young SMILES) to improve the health-related quality of life of children and young people of parents with serious mental illness: randomised feasibility protocol

Gellatly, Judith, Bee, Penny, Gega, Lina, Bower, Peter, Hunter, Diane, Stewart, Paul, Stanley, Nicky, Calam, Rachel, Holt, Kim, Wolpert, Miranda, Douglas, Simon, Green, Jonathan, Kolade, Adekeye, Callender, Craig and Abel, Kathryn (2018) A community-based intervention (Young SMILES) to improve the health-related quality of life of children and young people of parents with serious mental illness: randomised feasibility protocol. Trials, 19 (1). ISSN 1745-6215

[img]
Preview
Text (Full text)
Gellatly et al - Young SMILES OA.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (956kB) | Preview
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-018-2935-6

Abstract

Background
Children and young people of parents with mental illness (COPMI) are at risk of poor mental, physical and emotional health, which can persist into adulthood. They also experience poorer social outcomes and wellbeing as well as poorer quality of life than their peers with ‘healthy’ parents. The needs of COPMI are likely to be significant; however, their prevalence is unknown, although estimates suggest over 60% of adults with a serious mental illness have children. Many receive little or no support and remain ‘hidden’, stigmatised or do not regard themselves as ‘in need’. Recent UK policies have identified supporting COPMI as a key priority, but this alone is insufficient and health-related quality of life has been neglected as an outcome.

Methods/design
An age-appropriate standardised intervention for COPMI, called Young SMILES, was developed in collaboration with service users, National Health Service (NHS) and non-NHS stakeholders in our previous work. This protocol describes a randomised feasibility trial comparing Young SMILES with usual care, involving 60 families that will be identified through third sector organisations and NHS services, and recruited and randomised on a 1:1 basis to receive Young SMILES or usual care. Outcomes of the feasibility trial are rates of recruitment, follow-up and withdrawals, intervention uptake, and engagement. The optimal child-reported outcomes will also be determined alongside the assessment of resource use. A qualitative evaluation conducted at 3-months will explore the experiences and views of children and young people as well as parents accessing the intervention and the facilitators delivering the intervention.

Discussion
This paper details the rationale, design, training and recruitment methods for a feasibility study to inform the design and effective implementation of a larger scale randomised controlled trial of Young SMILES.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Parental mental illness, children, young people, health-related quality of life, intervention, feasibility, qualitative
Subjects: B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Social Work, Education and Community Wellbeing
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2018 08:51
Last Modified: 19 Feb 2019 10:16
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/36331

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics


Policies: NRL Policies | NRL University Deposit Policy | NRL Deposit Licence