A prospective randomised controlled trial of intermittent self-catheterisation vs. supra-public catheterisation for post-operative bladder care following radical hysterectomy

Naik, Raj, Maughan, Karen, Lopes, Alberto De Barros, Nordin, Andy, Godfrey, Keith and Hatem, Mohamed (2005) A prospective randomised controlled trial of intermittent self-catheterisation vs. supra-public catheterisation for post-operative bladder care following radical hysterectomy. Gynecologic Oncology, 99 (2). pp. 437-442. ISSN 0090-8258

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2005.06.048

Abstract

Objective. To determine the potential benefits of ISC (intermittent self-catheterisation) over SPC (supra-pubic catheterisation) in the post-operative bladder care of women following radical hysterectomy.
Methods. A prospective randomised controlled trial of women treated by radical hysterectomy for early stage cervical cancer. Results. 40 women were recruited to the study, 21 to ISC and 19 to SPC. All patients randomised to ISC were able to learn the technique of ISC satisfactorily following a period of pre-operative training. The day 3 and day 5 positive CSU (catheter specimen of urine) rate was significantly higher in the ISC group (42% and 63%) compared to the SPC group (6% and 18%), P = 0.05 and P = 0.004, respectively). Eight of 17 patients randomised to SPC (47%) documented having symptoms/problems arising from the SPC site of which 4 (23%) were shown to have a positive wound swab. There was no significant difference in length of period for bladder care between the two groups, P = 0.83. However, there were significant differences in patient acceptability (P = 0.009), freedom to lead a normal life (P = 0.000), disturbance at night (P = 0.006) and patient anxiety/embarrassment (P = 0.005) between the two groups. Conclusions. Patients are able to learn the technique of ISC without difficulty. Despite a greater urinary tract infection rate, the high incidence of SPC site problems can be avoided by use of ISC. The technique of ISC was seen to be more acceptable to patients allowing fewer disturbances at night, greater freedom to lead a normal life during the day and less anxiety/embarrassment compared to SPC.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This NHS levy funded trial has been presented regionally (Northern Cancer Network annual conference 2005), nationally (British Gynaecological Cancer Society conference 2005), and internationally (International Gynaecological Cancer Society bi-annual conference, California 2006). This paper has played a pivotal role in developing bladder care for women following surgery for cervical cancer.
Uncontrolled Keywords: cervical cancer,bladder care, prospective randomised controlled trial
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Health, Community and Education Studies > Nursing, Midwifery and Health
Depositing User: EPrint Services
Date Deposited: 16 May 2008 15:38
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2016 16:05
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/364

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