The effect of varying degrees of compression from elastic vs plastic wrap on quadriceps intramuscular temperature during wetted ice application

Kwiecien, Susan Y., Mathew, Stephen, Howatson, Glyn and McHugh, Malachy P. (2019) The effect of varying degrees of compression from elastic vs plastic wrap on quadriceps intramuscular temperature during wetted ice application. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 29 (8). pp. 1109-1114. ISSN 0905-7188

[img] Text
Kwiecien_et_al-2019-Scandinavian_Journal_of_Medicine_&_Science_in_Sports.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 24 April 2020.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13430

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of wetted ice bag, applied with high compression elastic wrap or held in place with low compression plastic wrap, on reducing vastus lateralis intramuscular temperature and skin surface temperature. Ten healthy male participants had wetted ice packs applied to a standardized area on the anterior aspect of the quadriceps simultaneously to both legs for 30 minutes. The ice pack was secured with high compression (elastic wrap) to the left anterior thigh (60.6 ± 8.1 mm Hg) and low compression (plastic wrap) to the right anterior thigh (15.5 ± 4.0 mm Hg). Intramuscular temperature (1 and 3 cm) and skin temperature of the vastus lateralis were measured continuously during a 10‐minute baseline period, 30‐minute treatment period, and a 60‐minute recovery period. No difference was observed between treatments in terms of the magnitude of reduction in intramuscular temperature at both 1 cm and 3 cm and skin temperature regardless of compression pressure (P > .05). Temperature upon conclusion of elastic wrap treatment was: 17.8 ± 5.2°C at 1 cm, 23.1 ± 4.9°C at 3 cm; plastic wrap treatment: 17.9 ± 4.4°C at 1 cm, 24.5 ± 6.7°C at 3 cm. Plastic wraps may offer a practical alternative to elastic wraps for clinicians as they may be disposed of by the patient or athlete without having to stay at the treatment facility.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ice bag, cryotherapy, muscle recovery, thermocouple
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 09 Apr 2019 11:26
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2019 09:50
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/38859

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics


Policies: NRL Policies | NRL University Deposit Policy | NRL Deposit Licence