The Feasibility and Acceptability of using a Novel Wrist Worn Cueing Device to Self-Manage Drooling Problems in People with Parkinson’s Disease: a Pilot Study

McNaney, Róisín, Miller, Nicholas, Vines, John, Olivier, Patrick, Ladha, Karim, Jackson, Dan and Walker, Richard (2019) The Feasibility and Acceptability of using a Novel Wrist Worn Cueing Device to Self-Manage Drooling Problems in People with Parkinson’s Disease: a Pilot Study. Journal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies Engineering, 6. pp. 1-11. ISSN 2055-6683

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1177/2055668319852529

Abstract

Introduction: Daytime drooling is experienced by around 50% of Parkinson’s patients, who fail to swallow saliva in sufficient volume or regularity, despite normal production. This research explored the feasibility and acceptability of using a cueing device, to improve drooling.

Methods: During a 4-week intervention, 28 participants were asked to use a cueing device for one hour per day. During this time, the device vibrated once-per-minute, reminding the participant to swallow their saliva. A daily diary was used to collect self-report around swallowing severity, frequency and duration. This was filled out by participants for 1 week before, 4 weeks during, and for 1 week immediately after intervention. Diaries were also collected for 1 week during a follow up, carried out 4 weeks after intervention finished.

Results: Participants self-reported benefits in drooling severity (p=0.031), frequency (p=<0.001), and duration (p=0.001) after using the device. Improvements were maintained at follow up. Twenty-two participants explicitly reported a positive benefit to their drooling during exit interview. All felt the intervention and device were acceptable and usable.

Conclusions: Using a cueing device for 1 month had perceived benefit to drooling severity, frequency and duration in patients with Parkinson’s. Participants accepted the device and treatment protocol.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: assistive technology, human factors, rehabilitation devices, self care, therapeutic value
Subjects: B800 Medical Technology
Department: Faculties > Arts, Design and Social Sciences > Design
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2019 09:01
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2019 16:00
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/39104

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