The emerging field of venom-microbiomics for exploring venom as a microenvironment, and the corresponding Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (iVAMP)

Ul-Hasan, Sabah, Rodríguez-Román, Eduardo, Reitzel, Adam M., Adams, Rachelle M.M., Herzig, Volker, Trim, Steven A., Saviola, Anthony J., Nobile, Clarissa J., Stiers, Erin E., Moschos, Sterghios, Keiser, Carl N., Petras, Daniel, Moran, Yehu and Colston, Timothy J. (2019) The emerging field of venom-microbiomics for exploring venom as a microenvironment, and the corresponding Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (iVAMP). Toxicon: X, 4. p. 100016. ISSN 2590-1710

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxcx.2019.100016

Abstract

Venom is a known source of novel antimicrobial natural products. The substantial, increasing number of these discoveries have unintentionally culminated in the misconception that venom and venom-producing glands are largely sterile environments. Culture-dependent and -independent studies on the microbial communities in venom microenvironments reveal the presence of archaea, algae, bacteria, endoparasites, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. Venom-centric microbiome studies are relatively sparse to date and the adaptive advantages that venom-associated microbes might offer to their hosts, or that hosts might provide to venom-associated microbes, remain unknown. We highlight the potential for the discovery of venom-microbiomes within the adaptive landscape of venom systems. The considerable number of known, convergently evolved venomous animals juxtaposed with the comparatively few studies to identify microbial communities in venom provides new possibilities for both biodiversity and therapeutic discoveries. We present an evidence-based argument for integrating microbiology as part of venomics to which we refer to as venom-microbiomics. We also introduce iVAMP, the Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (https://ivamp-consortium.github.io/), as a growing consortium for interested parties to contribute and collaborate within this subdiscipline. Our consortium seeks to support diversity, inclusion and scientific collaboration among all researchers interested in this subdiscipline.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: venom, microbiome, virus, bacteria, infection, snakebite, symbiont, coevolution, holobiont
Subjects: C100 Biology
C500 Microbiology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Applied Sciences
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 25 Sep 2019 16:15
Last Modified: 18 Oct 2019 09:15
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/40856

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