Impact of extreme weather events and climate change for health and social care systems

Curtis, Sarah, Fair, Alistair, Wistow, Jonathan, Val, Dimitri V. and Oven, Katie (2017) Impact of extreme weather events and climate change for health and social care systems. Environmental Health, 16 (S1). p. 128. ISSN 1476-069X

[img]
Preview
Text
s12940-017-0324-3.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (339kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12940-017-0324-3

Abstract

This review, commissioned by the Research Councils UK Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) programme, concerns research on the impacts on health and social care systems in the United Kingdom of extreme weather events, under conditions of climate change. Extreme weather events considered include heatwaves, coldwaves and flooding. Using a structured review method, we consider evidence regarding the currently observed and anticipated future impacts of extreme weather on health and social care systems and the potential of preparedness and adaptation measures that may enhance resilience. We highlight a number of general conclusions which are likely to be of international relevance, although the review focussed on the situation in the UK. Extreme weather events impact the operation of health services through the effects on built, social and institutional infrastructures which support health and health care, and also because of changes in service demand as extreme weather impacts on human health. Strategic planning for extreme weather and impacts on the care system should be sensitive to within country variations. Adaptation will require changes to built infrastructure systems (including transport and utilities as well as individual care facilities) and also to institutional and social infrastructure supporting the health care system. Care sector organisations, communities and individuals need to adapt their practices to improve resilience of health and health care to extreme weather. Preparedness and emergency response strategies call for action extending beyond the emergency response services, to include health and social care providers more generally.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: F800 Physical and Terrestrial Geographical and Environmental Sciences
L700 Human and Social Geography
Department: Faculties > Engineering and Environment > Geography and Environmental Sciences
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 05 Nov 2019 14:34
Last Modified: 05 Nov 2019 14:45
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/41369

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics