What Killed Moritz Erhardt? Internships and the Cultural Dangers of “Positive” Ideas

Amiridis, Kostas, Watt, Peter and Costea, Bogdan (2015) What Killed Moritz Erhardt? Internships and the Cultural Dangers of “Positive” Ideas. tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society, 13 (2). pp. 375-389. ISSN 1726-670X

[img]
Preview
Text
611-Article Text-2855-1-10-20150930.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives 4.0.

Download (986kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.31269/triplec.v13i2.611

Abstract

Moritz Erhardt’s tragic death as an intern at Bank of America Merrill Lynch in August 2013 provides an illustration of the cultural intensity and complexity that has come to imbue internships in higher education degree schemes. We offer an analysis of internships as part of a wider process of dissemination and proliferation of managerial vocabularies and images that underpin certain hyperperformative practices that permeate the powerful cultures stimulated by and sustained in many organizations. We analyze the cultural ground from which such practices might be seen to arise and present an interpretation of how certain “positive” themes and motifs—such as “potentiality”, “selfexpression”, or “self-realization”—can become dangerous. These categories become dangerous once they are constituted as ideal measures of an unattainable level of performativity which can then become destabilizing and disorienting for any individual’s sense of self. In this sense, the paper contributes to the growing body of literature investigating the significance of internships in the new cultures of work characterizing the broader context of neoliberalism.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: internships, management, performativity, employability, self-actualization, self-realization, potential, work culture, soft capitalism
Subjects: N100 Business studies
N600 Human Resource Management
N900 Others in Business and Administrative studies
Department: Faculties > Business and Law > Newcastle Business School
Depositing User: Rachel Branson
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2020 15:46
Last Modified: 02 Mar 2020 16:00
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/42316

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics