Mineralization of native soil organic matter is not regulated by the size, activity or composition of the soil microbial biomass—a new perspective

Kemmitt, Sarah, Lanyon, Clare, Waite, Ian, Wen, Q., Addiscott, Thomas, Bird, Nigel R. A., O'Donnell, Anthony and Brookes, Philip (2008) Mineralization of native soil organic matter is not regulated by the size, activity or composition of the soil microbial biomass—a new perspective. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 40 (1). pp. 61-73. ISSN 0038-0717

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2007.06.021

Abstract

Soil organic matter is extensively humified; some fractions existing for more than 1000 years. The soil microbial biomass is surrounded by about 50 times its mass of soil organic matter, but can only metabolize it very slowly. Paradoxically, even if more than 90% of the soil microbial biomass is killed, the mineralization of soil organic matter proceeds at the same rate as in an unperturbed soil. Here we show that soil organic matter mineralization is independent of microbial biomass size, community structure or specific activity. We suggest that the rate limiting step is governed by abiological processes (which we term the Regulatory Gate hypothesis), which convert non-bioavailable soil organic matter into bioavailable soil organic matter, and cannot be affected by the microbial population. This work challenges one of the long held theories in soil microbiology proposed by Winogradsky, of the existence of autochthonous and zymogenous microbial populations. This has significant implications for our understanding of carbon mineralization in soils and the role of soil micro-organisms in the global carbon cycle. Here we describe experiments designed to determine if the Regulatory Gate operates. We conclude that there is sufficient experimental evidence for it to be offered as a working hypothesis.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: soil microbial biomass, PLFAs, ATP, organic matter mineralization, chloroform fumigation, regulatory gate
Subjects: C500 Microbiology
C900 Others in Biological Sciences
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Applied Sciences
Depositing User: Ay Okpokam
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2012 13:17
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2015 11:46
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/4493

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics


Policies: NRL Policies | NRL University Deposit Policy | NRL Deposit Licence