Effects of chronic and acute consumption of fruit- and vegetable-puree-based drinks on vasodilation, risk factors for CVD and the response as a result of the eNOS G298T polymorphism

George, Trevor, Niwat, Chutamat, Waroonphan, Saran, Gordon, Michael and Lovegrove, Julie (2009) Effects of chronic and acute consumption of fruit- and vegetable-puree-based drinks on vasodilation, risk factors for CVD and the response as a result of the eNOS G298T polymorphism. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 68 (02). p. 148. ISSN 0029-6651

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0029665109001165

Abstract

The average UK adult consumes less than three portions of fruit and vegetables daily, despite evidence to suggest that consuming five portions daily could help prevent chronic diseases. It is recommended that fruit juice should only count as one of these portions, as juicing removes fibre and releases sugars. However, fruit juices contain beneficial compounds such as vitamin C and flavonoids and could be a useful source of dietary phytochemicals. Two randomised controlled cross-over intervention studies investigating the effects of chronic and acute consumption of commercially-available fruit- and vegetable-puree-based drinks (FVPD) on bioavailability, antioxidant status and CVD risk factors are described. Blood and urine samples were collected during both studies and vascular tone was measured using laser Doppler imaging. In the chronic intervention study FVPD consumption was found to significantly increase dietary carotenoids (P=0·001) and vitamin C (P=0·003). Plasma carotenoids were increased (P=0·001), but the increase in plasma vitamin C was not significant. There were no significant effects on oxidative stress, antioxidant status and other CVD risk factors. In the acute intervention study FVPD were found to increase total plasma nitrate and nitrite (P=0·001) and plasma vitamin C (P=0·002). There was no effect on plasma lipids or uric acid, but there was a lower glucose and insulin peak concentration after consumption of the FVPD compared with the sugar-matched control. There was a trend towards increased vasodilation following both chronic and acute FVPD consumption. All volunteers were retrospectively genotyped for the eNOS G298T polymorphism and the effect of genotype on the measurements is discussed. Overall, there was a non-significant trend towards increased endothelium-dependent vasodilation following both acute and chronic FVPD consumption. However, there was a significant time×treatment effect (P<0·05) of acute FVPD consumption in individuals with the GG variant of the eNOS gene.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: carotenoids, flavonoids, laser doppler imaging
Subjects: B400 Nutrition
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Applied Sciences
Depositing User: Ay Okpokam
Date Deposited: 18 Jan 2012 10:48
Last Modified: 11 May 2017 16:18
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/4563

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