Multiple System Modelling and Analysis of Physiological and Brain Activity and Performance at Rest and During Exercise

Chuckravanen, Dineshen (2012) Multiple System Modelling and Analysis of Physiological and Brain Activity and Performance at Rest and During Exercise. Doctoral thesis, Northumbria University.

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Abstract

One of the current interests of exercise physiologists is to understand the nature and control of fatigue related to physical activity to optimise athletic performance.
Therefore, this research focuses on the mathematical modelling and analysis of the energy system pathways and the system control mechanisms to investigate the various human metabolic processes involved both at rest and during exercise. The first case study showed that the PCr utilisation was the highest energy contributor during sprint running, and the rate of ATP production for each anaerobic subsystem was similar for each athlete. The second study showed that the energy expenditure derived from the aerobic and anaerobic processes for different types of pacing were significantly different. The third study demonstrated
the presence of the control mechanisms, and their characteristics as well as complexity differed significantly for any physiological organ system. The fourth study showed that the control mechanisms manifest themselves in specific ranges of frequency bands, and these influence athletic performance. The final study demonstrated a significant difference in both reaction time and accuracy of the
responses to visual cues between the control and exercise-involved cognitive trials. Moreover, the difference in the EEG power ratio at specific regions of the brain; the difference in the ERP components’ amplitudes and latencies; and the difference in entropy of the EEG signals represented the physiological factors in explaining the poor cognitive performance of the participants following an exhaustive exercise bout. Therefore, by using mathematical modelling and analysis of the energy system pathways and the system control mechanisms responsible for homeostasis, this research has expanded the knowledge how performance is regulated during physical activity and together with the support of the existing biological control theories to explain the development of fatigue during physical activity.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Uncontrolled Keywords: pacing strategy, sports performance, system control mechanisms, nonlinear mathematical modelling, cognitive performance, arousal state
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
University Services > Research and Innovation Services > Graduate School > Doctor of Philosophy
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Depositing User: Ellen Cole
Date Deposited: 15 Aug 2012 09:51
Last Modified: 17 May 2017 04:58
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/8435

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