Learning from temporary use and the making of on-demand communities in London’s Olympic “fringes”

Ferreri, Mara (2019) Learning from temporary use and the making of on-demand communities in London’s Olympic “fringes”. Urban Geography. pp. 1-19. ISSN 0272-3638 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/02723638.2019.1679527

Abstract

Community-oriented temporary uses are a subset of interim use in vacant urban spaces, alongside creative and commercial practices. Its proponents argue that they can inform more incremental and residents-led local urban development. Under urban austerity, however, temporary uses can become vehicles for the short-term and conditional delivery of social benefits. In this paper, I analyse a community-oriented interim use project commissioned by a public development body as part of the London 2012 Olympic Games urban regeneration program. Drawing upon policy analysis and interviews with planners, policymakers, architects and community members, I unravel competing discourses, positions, power dynamics and temporalities, and their relationship to the Games’ legacy. The paper contributes to debates about the normalization of temporary urbanism and pop-up geographies in times of urban austerity, shedding light on the potential long-term implications of the logic of “on-demand communities” in urban development and planning.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: London 2012 Olympic Games, interim uses, on-demand communities, pop-up geographies, urban regeneration
Subjects: L700 Human and Social Geography
Department: Faculties > Engineering and Environment > Geography and Environmental Sciences
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2019 11:40
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2019 16:45
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/41399

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