A longitudinal, observational study examining the relationships of patient satisfaction with services and mental well-being to their clinical course in young people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus during transition from child to adult health services

Gray, S., Cheetham, T., McConachie, H., Mann, K. D., Parr, J. R., Pearce, M. S., Colver, A., Transition Collaborative Group, and Bate, Angela (2018) A longitudinal, observational study examining the relationships of patient satisfaction with services and mental well-being to their clinical course in young people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus during transition from child to adult health services. Diabetic Medicine, 35 (9). pp. 1216-1222. ISSN 0742-3071

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13698

Abstract

AIM: We hypothesized that participant well-being and satisfaction with services would be positively associated with a satisfactory clinical course during transition from child to adult health care.

METHODS: Some 150 young people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus from five diabetes units in England were recruited to a longitudinal study of transition. Each young person was visited at home four times by a research assistant; each visit was 1 year apart. Satisfaction with services (Mind the Gap; MTG) and mental well-being (Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale; WEMWBS) were captured. Change in HbA1c , episodes of ketoacidosis, clinic and retinal screening attendance were used to assess clinical course. In total, 108 of 150 (72%) young people had sufficient data for analysis at visit 4.

RESULTS: Mean age at entry was 16 years. By visit 4, 81.5% had left paediatric healthcare services. Median HbA1c increased significantly (P = 0.01) from 69 mmol/mol (8.5%) at baseline to 75 mmol/mol (9.0%) at visit 4. WEMWBS scores were comparable with those in the general population at baseline and were stable over the study period. MTG scores were also stable. By visit 4, some 32 individuals had a 'satisfactory' and 76 a 'suboptimal' clinical course. There were no significant differences in average WEMWBS and MTG scores between the clinical course groups (P = 0.96, 0.52 respectively); nor was there a significant difference in transfer status between the clinical course groups.

CONCLUSIONS: The well-being of young people with diabetes and their satisfaction with transition services are not closely related to their clinical course. Investigating whether innovative psycho-educational interventions can improve the clinical course is a research priority.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Members of the Transition Collaborative Group are given under the heading Collaborators. Collaborators The Transition Collaborative Group consists of the authors of this paper and other co-applicants: Angela Bate, Newcastle University, Caroline Bennett, Council for Disabled Children, London, Gail Dovey-Pearce, Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Janet McDonagh, University of Manchester, Tim Rapley, Northumbria University,Newcastle, Debbie Reape, Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Luke Vale, Newcastle University; Advisors: Nichola Chater, Northumberland Tyne and Wear Mental health NHS Trust, Helena Gleeson, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham; Local investigators: Anastasia Bem, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Stuart Bennett, Rake Lane Hospital, North Shields, Amanda Billson, Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Foundation Trust, Stephen Bruce, Rake Lane Hospital, North Shields, Tim Cheetham, Great North Children’s Hospital, Newcastle, Diana Howlett, Sirona Care and Health, Bristol, Zilla Huma, Formerly Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust, Mark Linden, Queens University Belfast, Maria Lohan, Queens University Belfast, Melanie Meek, Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust, Jenny Milne, Tyne, Esk and Wear Valley Mental Health NHS Trust, Julie Owens, Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Fiona Regan, Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust, Nandu Thalange, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.
Subjects: B700 Nursing
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Nursing, Midwifery and Health
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 03 Jan 2020 12:05
Last Modified: 03 Jan 2020 12:15
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/41801

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