Impaired Insulin Profiles Following a Single Night of Sleep Restriction: The Impact of Acute Sprint Interval Exercise

Sweeney, Emma, Peart, Daniel, Kyza, Irene, Harkes, Thomas, Ellis, Jason and Walshe, Ian (2020) Impaired Insulin Profiles Following a Single Night of Sleep Restriction: The Impact of Acute Sprint Interval Exercise. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 30 (2). pp. 139-144. ISSN 1526-484X

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Sweeney et al. 2019 IJSNEM Accepted manuscript.pdf - Accepted Version

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2019-0235

Abstract

Experimental sleep restriction (SR) has demonstrated reduced insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals. Exercise is well-known to be beneficial for metabolic health. A single bout of exercise has the capacity to increase insulin sensitivity for up to 2 days. Therefore, the current study aimed to determine if sprint interval exercise could attenuate the impairment in insulin sensitivity after one night of SR in healthy males. Nineteen males were recruited for this randomized crossover study which consisted of four conditions—control, SR, control plus exercise, and sleep restriction plus exercise. Time in bed was 8 hr (2300–0700) in the control conditions and 4 hr (0300–0700) in the SR conditions. Conditions were separated by a 1-week entraining period. Participants slept at home, and compliance was assessed using wrist actigraphy. Following the night of experimental sleep, participants either conducted sprint interval exercise or rested for the equivalent duration. An oral glucose tolerance test was then conducted. Blood samples were obtained at regular intervals for measurement of glucose and insulin. Insulin concentrations were higher in SR than control (p = .022). Late-phase insulin area under the curve was significantly lower in sleep restriction plus exercise than SR (862 ± 589 and 1,267 ± 558; p = .004). Glucose area under the curve was not different between conditions (p = .207). These findings suggest that exercise improves the late postprandial response following a single night of SR.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Glucose metabolism, sleep loss, high intensity exercise
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Psychology
Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 21 Jan 2020 15:06
Last Modified: 13 May 2020 16:15
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/41962

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