The cost of prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes in Scotland: data from the Scottish Care Information–Diabetes Collaboration

McMeekin, Peter, Geue, C., Mocevic, E., Hoxer, C.S., Ochs, A., McGurnaghan, S., Colhoun, H.M., Wild, S.H., Wu, O. and The Scottish Diabetes Research Network Epidemiology Subgroup, (2020) The cost of prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes in Scotland: data from the Scottish Care Information–Diabetes Collaboration. Diabetic Medicine. ISSN 0742-3071 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.14253

Abstract

Aim
To compare costs for three groups of people with type 2 diabetes, those at high risk of future cardiovascular disease, those without cardiovascular disease and those with established cardiovascular disease, and to also compare costs incurred by people with type 2 diabetes with an incident cardiovascular disease event with those who remain incident event‐free over a 3‐year period.

Methods
Data about people with type 2 diabetes in Scotland were obtained from the Scottish Care Information Diabetes registry. Data linkage was used to retrieve information on healthcare utilization, care home use and deaths. Productivity effects were estimated for those of non‐pensionable age. We estimated costs over 12 months (prevalent cardiovascular disease) and 3 years from incident cardiovascular disease event.

Results
Mean annual cost per person with established cardiovascular disease was £6900, £3300 for a person at high risk of future cardiovascular disease, and £2500 for a person without cardiovascular disease and not at high risk. In year 1, the cost of an incident cardiovascular disease event was £16 700 compared with £2100 for people without an incident event. Over 2 years, the cumulative costs were £21 500 and £4200, and by year 3, £25 000 and £5900, respectively.

Conclusions
Cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes places a significant financial burden on healthcare and the wider economy. Our results emphasize the financial consequences of cardiovascular disease prevention strategies.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B300 Complementary Medicine
B700 Nursing
B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Nursing, Midwifery and Health
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 05 Feb 2020 11:42
Last Modified: 10 Apr 2020 13:30
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/42030

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