The role of psychosocial factors in predicting formalized human milk donation to nonprofit milk banks

Shepherd, Lee and Lovell, Brian (2020) The role of psychosocial factors in predicting formalized human milk donation to nonprofit milk banks. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 50 (6). pp. 327-336. ISSN 0021-9029

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/jasp.12662

Abstract

Human milk donation is important for improving the development of preterm infants. However, despite the importance of donating human milk, relatively little research has tested which factors predict this form of donation. This study assessed the association between psychosocial factors and formalized milk donation to a non-profit milk bank. This study used a cross-sectional design. Breastfeeding mothers (N = 556) completed measures assessing altruism, pride, instrumental and affective attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, anxiety, and intention to donate human milk to a non-profit milk bank. We also assessed whether participants requested additional information about donating human milk. Instrumental and affective attitude, subjective norm, and self-efficacy were positively associated with intention to donate milk. Self-efficacy and intention were also uniquely associated with requesting additional information. The intention to engage in formalized milk donation to a non-profit milk bank appears to be more likely if women view this action as beneficial, believe significant others support the action and think they have the ability to undertake this action. Women who think they have the ability to undertake this action and are willing to donate are more likely to request additional information. These findings might inform future experimental research and campaigns on human milk donation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Human milk donation, theory of planned behavior, self-efficacy
Subjects: C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 03 Mar 2020 09:46
Last Modified: 18 Sep 2020 13:00
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/42323

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