An exploration of the factors influencing career choice in mental health

McKenzie, Karen, Murray, Aja, Cooper, Matthew, Martin, Rachel, Murray, Kara, Baguley, Clare and Chiscop, Andra (2020) An exploration of the factors influencing career choice in mental health. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 29 (19-20). pp. 3764-3773. ISSN 0962-1067

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.15406

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To identify the factors that are associated with considering a career in mental health.

Background: The mental health specialty is facing a recruitment crisis in the United Kingdom but there is limited evidence about which factors encourage and discourage people to consider a career in mental health.

Design: Quantitative, observational, online survey using a multiple ordinal logistic regression model to identify if there were any significant predictors of the extent to which participants would consider a career in mental health. The design and write up of the study were guided by the STROBE checklist.
Method: We gathered the views of 231 participants (female = 188, 81.7%) aged between 16 and 65 (mean = 22.7, SD = 8.9), using an online survey, the majority of whom were studying on, or graduates of, psychology/social studies degrees. Information was gathered about the extent to which a range of factors influenced consideration of a career in mental health.

Results: The majority (71.2%) of participants reported that they would definitely or probably consider undertaking a career in mental health, and over half (51.4%) would consider a career as a mental health nurse. The ability to help others and receiving appropriate training required for the role were important career choice factors. Being female, having a mental health condition, and greater knowledge of mental health, were associated with a significantly greater likelihood of considering a career in mental health, while having had experience of working with people with mental health difficulties was significantly negatively associated.

Conclusions: Students and graduates of psychology and social studies degrees appear to be a large, untapped recruitment pool for mental health services.

Relevance to clinical practice: The results can inform more targeted recruitment strategies and development of suitable career pathways for those interested in a career in mental health.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Recruitment; Mental Health; Nursing: Staff: barriers; facilitators
Subjects: B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: John Coen
Date Deposited: 30 Jun 2020 07:40
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2020 08:15
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/43603

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