Marginalized to double marginalized: My mutational intersectionality between the East and the West

Abdellatif, Amal (2020) Marginalized to double marginalized: My mutational intersectionality between the East and the West. Gender, Work & Organization. ISSN 0968-6673 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/gwao.12558

Abstract

Intersectionality allows better understanding of the differences between individuals' experiences. In this article, I use intersectionality to explore how my lived experience of marginalization is different from one context to another. I reflect on how the nature of intersectionality and the intensity of oppression are altered by context. Grounded in a brief reflection of my fragmented experience in two different contexts, I explore how my identities and their intersection “mutate” from the Egyptian context to the UK context. Then, I reflect on how the intensity of oppression changed with this alteration in my intersectionality. In contextualizing my intersectional experience, first I problematize viewing intersectionality as a fixed acontextual ontology. Second, as a student immigrant and racialized minority in the United Kingdom, I seek to extend intersectionality and move beyond the traditional categories of race, class, gender, religion, and sexuality to include precarity as a pivotal social category that amplifies the intensity of oppression and marginalization, especially when intersected with race and gender. Finally, in sharing my reflection as a Middle Eastern woman, I contribute my unique experiences into the conversation, and a voice that has been muted, invisibled, marginalized, and excluded from the literature.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Intersectionality, mutating identities, precariousness, racial minorities
Subjects: L900 Others in Social studies
N900 Others in Business and Administrative studies
Department: Faculties > Business and Law > Newcastle Business School
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2020 10:06
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2020 15:45
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/44381

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