‘Cheap Merchandise’: Atrocity and Undocumented Migrants in Transit in Mexico’s War on Drugs

Trevino-Rangel, Javier (2020) ‘Cheap Merchandise’: Atrocity and Undocumented Migrants in Transit in Mexico’s War on Drugs. Critical Sociology. 089692052096181. ISSN 0896-9205 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1177/0896920520961815

Abstract

Undocumented migrants in transit in Mexico are victims of atrocity. The subject has been largely ignored by scholars, however, until recently when a number of migration experts became interested in the matter. Most observers argue that abuses suffered by migrants are the consequence of the ‘securitization’ of Mexican immigration policy. For them, Mexican authorities perceive migrants from Central America as a threat to national security and have hardened laws and migratory practices as a result, but there is insufficient evidence to support these claims. This article looks at the political economy of undocumented migration in transit in Mexico and the violence associated with it. It investigates the abuses suffered by migrants not as the result of supposed security policies but rather as the consequence of the interplay between local and global economies that generate profits from undocumented migration. The article explores the role played by state officials, cartels and ordinary Mexicans in the migration industry.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Central America, migration industry, atrocity, war on drugs, political economy, human rights, Mexico, migration
Subjects: L300 Sociology
L600 Anthropology
L700 Human and Social Geography
L900 Others in Social studies
Department: Faculties > Arts, Design and Social Sciences > Social Sciences
Depositing User: Rachel Branson
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2020 11:35
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2020 11:45
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/44442

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