Effectiveness of diet and physical activity interventions amongst adults attending colorectal and breast cancer screening: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Orange, Sam, Hicks, Kirsty and Saxton, John (2020) Effectiveness of diet and physical activity interventions amongst adults attending colorectal and breast cancer screening: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Cancer Causes & Control. ISSN 0957-5243 (In Press)

[img]
Preview
Text (Advance online version)
Orange2020_Article_EffectivenessOfDietAndPhysical.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (1MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
Post_PeerReview_Copy (002).pdf - Accepted Version

Download (1MB) | Preview
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-020-01362-5

Abstract

Purpose: To estimate the effectiveness of tailored physical activity and dietary interventions amongst adults attending colorectal and breast cancer screening. Methods: Five literature databases were systematically searched to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of tailored physical activity and/or dietary interventions with follow-up support initiated through colorectal and breast cancer screening programmes. Outcomes included markers of body fatness, physical activity, and dietary intake. Mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random effects models. Results: Five RCTs met the inclusion criteria encompassing a total of 722 participants. Diet and physical activity interventions led to statistically significant reductions in body mass (MD − 1.6 kg, 95% CI − 2.7 to − 0.39 kg; I2 = 81%; low quality evidence), body mass index (MD − 0.78 kg/m2, 95% CI − 1.1 to − 0.50 kg/m2; I2 = 21%; moderate quality evidence), and waist circumference (MD − 2.9 cm, 95% CI − 3.8 to − 1.91; I2 = 0%; moderate quality evidence), accompanied by an increase in physical activity (SMD 0.31, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.50; I2 = 0%; low quality evidence) and fruit and vegetable intake (SMD 0.33, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.64; I2 = 51%; low quality evidence). Conclusion: There is low quality evidence that lifestyle interventions involving follow-up support lead to modest weight loss and increased physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake. Due to the modest intervention effects, low quality of evidence and small number of studies, further rigorously designed RCTs with long-term follow-up of modifiable risk factors and embedded cost–benefit analyses are warranted (PROSPERO ref: CRD42020179960).

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cancer screening, Risk reduction, Health promotion, Physical activity, Diet
Subjects: B400 Nutrition
B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2020 17:01
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2020 17:15
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/44772

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics