The Effects of Low-Intensity Multimodal Proprioceptive Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older Adults

Boyle, Spencer, Fothergill, Melissa, Metcalfe, John, Docherty, Sarah and Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal (2020) The Effects of Low-Intensity Multimodal Proprioceptive Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older Adults. Journal of Physical Activity and Health. pp. 1-6. ISSN 1543-3080 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2020-0134

Abstract

Background: Physical activity provides a number of physical and psychological benefits. Multimodal proprioceptive exercise represents a useful balance-based exercise with the potential to reduce falls in older adults. Previous research has also indicated cognitive benefits following multimodal proprioceptive exercise in young and older adults. This study aimed to assess cognition and mood following 2 types of physical activity (multimodal proprioception vs yoga) compared with control (classroom-based) in healthy older adults. Method: Nineteen older adults (Mage = 65, sex = 9 males) participated in this randomized controlled crossover trial. Participants completed a 20-minute multimodal proprioceptive exercise class, 20-minute yoga session, and 20-minute classroom-based control. Numeric working memory and mood were assessed before and immediately following each of the interventions. Results: The multimodal proprioceptive intervention significantly reduced numeric working memory reaction time versus the yoga (P = .043) and control (P = .023) group. There were no differences found for accuracy or mood. Conclusions: These results indicate that multimodal proprioceptive exercise is worthy of further investigation as an alternative mode of exercise alongside the more traditional aerobic and strength-based exercise for healthy older adults.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: proprioception, cognition, mood, aging
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Psychology
Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2020 16:07
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2020 16:07
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/44901

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