The effect of custom-fitted compression garments worn overnight for recovery from judo training in elite athletes

Brown, Freddy, Hill, Ken, Howatson, Glyn and Pedlar, Charles (2021) The effect of custom-fitted compression garments worn overnight for recovery from judo training in elite athletes. European Journal of Sport Science. ISSN 1746-1391 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2021.1891294

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of custom-fitted compression garments (CG) worn during recovery over a multi-day training camp in elite judo players (judoka). A single blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out in 11 elite judoka, using a two-way crossover design. Two three-day training camps were completed in CG and placebo conditions in a random order. Changes in performance and physiological markers were compared between conditions. Judoka were assessed before training for (maximal) isometric knee extension and grip strength, countermovement jump performance and bench-press velocity, alongside soreness, limb circumferences, plasma creatine kinase activity (CK) and perceived bruising. Measurements were repeated after 12 h, 36 h and 43 h of training, whereupon judoka rated the effectiveness of each intervention. Knee extension and bench-press performance demonstrated significant familiarization (p < 0.001), and were excluded from subsequent analysis. Jump performance was unaffected by training (p > 0.05). Grip strength declined throughout training (p < 0.001), with peak decrements of - 9.7 % indicating mild muscle damage. Increases in bruising, CK and soreness demonstrated highly variable, if significant (p < 0.001) responses. Although CG were perceived as significantly more effective than placebo for recovery (p = 0.046), no effects were observed for any other outcome (p > 0.05). Compression conferred no statistically significant impact upon recovery markers in elite judoka throughout training. Muscle damage responses were inconsistent in this population. Individual athletes would be advised to monitor habitually-used performance measures while using CG to ascertain whether perceptual benefits translate into enhanced recovery.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Judoka, strength, exercise-induced muscle damage, grip strength, reliability
Subjects: B100 Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology
C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Rachel Branson
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2021 09:50
Last Modified: 27 May 2021 11:04
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/45408

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