Unravelling perceived fatigue and activity pacing in maintaining a physically active lifestyle after stroke rehabilitation: a longitudinal cohort study

Seves, Bregje L., Hoekstra, Trynke, Hoekstra, Femke, Hettinga, Florentina, Dekker, Rienk and van der Woude, Lucas H. V. (2020) Unravelling perceived fatigue and activity pacing in maintaining a physically active lifestyle after stroke rehabilitation: a longitudinal cohort study. Disability and Rehabilitation. pp. 1-11. ISSN 0963-8288 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2020.1833090

Abstract

Purposes
To identify fatigue trajectories during/after stroke rehabilitation, to determine characteristics associated with trajectory membership before discharge and to investigate how these trajectories and activity pacing are associated with sustained physical activity after rehabilitation.

Methods
People after stroke (n = 206) were followed from 3–6 weeks before discharge (T0) to 14 (T1), 33 (T2) and 52 (T3) weeks after discharge from rehabilitation in the ReSpAct study. Latent Class analysis was used to identify trajectories of perceived fatigue. Binomial multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine characteristics associated with trajectory membership (T0). Multilevel regression analyses were used to investigate how perceived fatigue and activity pacing were associated with self-reported physical activity (T0–T3).

Results
Three fatigue trajectories were identified: high (n = 163), low (n = 41) and recovery (n = 2). Compared with the high fatigue trajectory, people in the low fatigue trajectory were more likely to report higher levels of health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) (OR = 3.07, 95%CI = 1.51–6.26) and physical activity (OR = 1.93, 95%CI = 1.07–3.47). Sustained high levels of physical activity after rehabilitation were significantly associated with low perceived fatigue and high perceived risk of overactivity.

Conclusions
Three fatigue trajectories after stroke rehabilitation were identified. High levels of HR-QoL and physical activity before discharge identified people in the low fatigue trajectory. A physically active lifestyle after rehabilitation was associated with low perceived fatigue and perceived risk of overactivity.

IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION
Since almost 80% of people after stroke in this study perceived severe fatigue up to 1 year after stroke rehabilitation, activities focusing on the management of fatigue symptoms should be integrated in general stroke rehabilitation.

In clinical practice, low levels of health-related quality of life and low levels of self-reported physical activity before discharge from stroke rehabilitation should be considered by rehabilitation professionals (e.g., physicians, physiotherapists, and physical activity counsellors) since these characteristics can predict chronic perceived fatigue up to 1 year after stroke rehabilitation.

A physical activity counselling programme delivered during and after stroke rehabilitation may be improved by incorporating tailored advice regarding the management of fatigue.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: health promotion, quality of life, Stroke, physical activity, perceived fatigue, activity pacing, latent class analyses
Subjects: B100 Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology
C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: Rachel Branson
Date Deposited: 17 May 2021 10:38
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2021 16:17
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/46186

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