Why do sports fans support or oppose the inclusion of trans women in women’s sports? An empirical study of fairness and gender identity

Cleland, Jamie, Cashmore, Ellis and Dixon, Kevin (2021) Why do sports fans support or oppose the inclusion of trans women in women’s sports? An empirical study of fairness and gender identity. Sport in Society. pp. 1-16. ISSN 1743-0437 (In Press)

[img] Text
Trans_women_FINAL.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 27 December 2022.

Download (260kB) | Request a copy
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/17430437.2021.1942456

Abstract

This article presents the responses of 4,113 sports fans (55% of whom self-identified as female), collected via an online survey from April 2019 to June 2019, about their views on trans women competing in women’s sports. In presenting the data we draw on two recurring themes – gender identity and fairness – to explain the contrasting views surrounding the traditional gendered organization of sports. The overall findings are that just over half of our male and female participants are against the inclusion of trans women, with non-binary participants more supportive and those who preferred not to disclose their gender identity less supportive. The article concludes by suggesting that whilst there is evidence of progressive attitudes amongst our participants, there is also strong resistance to trans women competing in women’s sports that is primarily related to the perceived retention of an unfair biological advantage by being assigned male at birth.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Fair play, gender, policy, sport, trans
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
L900 Others in Social studies
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: John Coen
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2021 08:16
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2021 10:34
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/46553

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics