High-intensity interval running impairs subsequent upper limb strength performance

ANDRADE, Luana S., DAVID, Gabriela B., KRÜGER, Vitor L., Wilhelm, Eurico N. and ALBERTON, Cristine L. (2021) High-intensity interval running impairs subsequent upper limb strength performance. The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 61 (6). pp. 803-809. ISSN 0022-4707

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.23736/S0022-4707.20.11458-0

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study compared the effect of treadmill running on subsequent upper limb exercise performance in young men. METHODS: Seventeen young men (24.8±5.2 years) completed a (1) bench press resistance exercise control session; (2) treadmill interval running protocol followed by the bench press session; (3) treadmill continuous running protocol followed by the bench press session. Four sets of the bench press exercise were performed at 80% of 1RM up to volitional failure. In the interval protocol, eight sprints of 40s at 100% of the velocity of maximal oxygen uptake, with 20s of passive interval between them were performed, whereas in the continuous protocol 30-min of treadmill running at 90% of the heart rate corresponding to second ventilatory threshold was performed. The number of maximal repetitions completed in each set and condition was recorded and compared using a two-way repeated measures ANOVA.
RESULTS: The interval protocol (18.7 ± 4.9 repetitions) resulted in a reduction in the number of bench press repetitions compared to the control protocol (21.4 ± 5.4 repetitions) (p=0.002); whereas continuous running did not affect the bench press performance (20.6 ± 4.4 repetitions). The total number of repetitions reduced from set to set in all protocols (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The results evidenced an impairment in the upper limb strength performance after high intensity interval, but not moderate intensity continuous running, which has implication for concurrent training planning and prescription.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: intensity interval training, Exercise, Muscle Strength, Resistance training
Subjects: C600 Sports Science
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: John Coen
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2021 09:19
Last Modified: 29 Jun 2021 09:30
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/46555

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