Body mass and growth rates in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) cared for in African wildlife sanctuaries, zoological institutions and research facilities: Body mass in captive chimpanzees

Curry, Bryony, Drane, Aimee L., Atencia, Rebeca, Feltrer, Yedra, Howatson, Glyn, Calvi, Thalita, Palmer, Christopher, Mottie, Sophie, Unwin, Steve, Tremblay, Joshua C., Sleeper, Meg M., Lammy, Michael L., Cooper, Steve, Stembridge, Mike and Shave, Rob (2022) Body mass and growth rates in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) cared for in African wildlife sanctuaries, zoological institutions and research facilities: Body mass in captive chimpanzees. Zoo Biology. ISSN 0733-3188 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/zoo.21718

Abstract

Captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) mature earlier in body mass and have a greater growth rate compared to wild individuals. However, relatively little is known about how growth parameters compare between chimpanzees living in different captive environments. To investigate, body mass was measured in 298 African sanctuary chimpanzees, and was acquired from 1030 zoological and 442 research chimpanzees, using data repositories. An ANCOVA, adjusting for age, was performed to assess same-sex body mass differences between adult sanctuary, zoological and research populations. Piecewise linear regression was performed to estimate sex-specific growth rates and the age at maturation, which were compared between sexes and across populations using extra-sum-of-squares F tests. Adult body mass was greater in the zoological and research populations compared to the sanctuary chimpanzees, in both sexes. Male and female sanctuary chimpanzees were estimated to have a slower rate of growth compared with their zoological and research counterparts. Additionally, male sanctuary chimpanzees were estimated to have an older age at maturation for body mass compared with zoological and research males, whereas the age at maturation was similar across female populations. For both the zoological and research populations, the estimated growth rate was greater in males compared to females. Together, these data contribute to current understanding of growth and maturation in this species and suggests marked differences between the growth patterns of chimpanzees living in different captive environments.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding information: We thank the staff at Tchimpounga Wildlife Sanctuary Congo, Chimfunshi Wildlife Sanctuary Zambia and Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary Sierra Leone that care for the sanctuary chimpanzees included in this study. We also thank Elisabeth Hunt from Species360 and the Primate Aging Database for the body mass data of chimpanzees housed in zoological institutions and research facilities, respectively. We also thank Sarah Simcox for all her help with data collection. Bryony A. Curry was funded by an International Doctoral Fellowship from the University of British Columbia Okanagan. Rob Shave was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, and the Canadian Foundation for Innovation.
Uncontrolled Keywords: growth, sexual dimorphism, maturation
Subjects: C300 Zoology
C900 Others in Biological Sciences
D900 Others in Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation
Depositing User: John Coen
Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2022 09:44
Last Modified: 12 Jul 2022 12:30
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/49439

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