The association between maternal and paternal substance use and child substance use, internalising and externalising problems: a systematic review and meta‐analysis

McGovern, R., Bogowicz, P., Meader, N., Kaner, E., Alderson, H., Craig, D., Geijer‐Simpson, E., Jackson, K., Muir, C., Salonen, D., Smart, D. and Newham, James (2023) The association between maternal and paternal substance use and child substance use, internalising and externalising problems: a systematic review and meta‐analysis. Addiction. ISSN 0965-2140 (In Press)

[img] Text
Addiction - 2023 - McGovern - The association between maternal and paternal substance use and child substance use .pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 6 January 2024.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/add.16127

Abstract

Background and aim
There is substantial evidence showing an association between parental substance use and child substance use and/or mental health problems. Most research focuses upon maternal substance use, with the influence of fathers who use substance often being overlooked. We aimed to investigate the differential effects of maternal and paternal substance use upon children aged 0-18 years.

Method
We used systematic review methods to identify observational studies examining the association between either maternal or paternal substance use and child substance use and/or mental health problems. The odds ratio (OR) effect measure was used, for ease of computation. We used a random effects model with the inverse variance method to meta-analyse the findings from eligible studies.

Findings
We included 17 unique studies with a total of 47,374 child participants. Maternal and paternal substance use were both associated with increased odds of child any drug use (OR=2.09; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.53, 2.86]; n=12,349 participants; three studies, and OR=2.86; 95% CI [1.25, 6.54]; n=5,692 participants; three studies, respectively), child alcohol problem use (OR=2.16; 95% CI [1.73, 2.71]; n=7,339 participants; four studies, and OR=1.70; 95% CI [1.36, 2.12]; n=14,219 participants; six studies), child externalising problems (OR=1.81; 95% CI [1.01, 3.22]; n=1,748 participants; three studies, and OR=1.60; 95% CI [1.18, 2.17]; n=2,508 participants; six studies), and child internalising problems (OR=1.60; 95% CI [1.25, 2.06]; n=1,748 participants; three studies, and OR=1.42; 95% CI [1.12, 1.81]; n=2,248 participants; five studies). Child any alcohol use was associated with maternal substance use only (OR=2.26; 95% CI [1.08, 4.70]; n=28,691 participants; five studies).

Conclusion
Both maternal and paternal substance use are associated with child substance use and mental health problems.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding information: Ruth McGovern has been funded to undertake this systematic review by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) personal fellowships (NIHR PDF-2014-07-045). Eileen Kaner is in receipt of support from NIHR Senior Investigator Award and is the Director of the NIHR Applied Research Collaboration, North East and North Cumbria. At the time of conducting the review Domna Salonen was supported by the NIHR HEE/NIHR ICA Programme Pre-doctoral Clinical Academic Fellowship (NIHR301146).
Uncontrolled Keywords: parental substance use; child substance use; child internalising problems; child externalising problems
Subjects: B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
C800 Psychology
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Elena Carlaw
Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2023 12:58
Last Modified: 16 Jan 2023 13:00
URI: https://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/51176

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics