Working with Insulin, Carbohydrates, Ketones and Exercise to Manage Diabetes (WICKED): Evaluation of a self-management course for young people with type 1 diabetes

Johnson, Barbara, Norman, Paul, Sanders, Tom, Elliott, Jackie, Whitehead, Vanessa, Campbell, Fiona, Hammond, Peter, Ajjan, Ramzi and Heller, Simon (2019) Working with Insulin, Carbohydrates, Ketones and Exercise to Manage Diabetes (WICKED): Evaluation of a self-management course for young people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic Medicine. ISSN 0742-3071 (In Press)

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.14077

Abstract

Aims. To evaluate a five-day self-management education course for young people with type 1 diabetes and assess its effects on knowledge, self-efficacy, beliefs, distress, self-management behaviours and HbA1c.

Methods. This is an evaluation of a structured education course. Young people (aged 16-24) with type 1 diabetes were recruited from three diabetes centres. In the first centre, participants completed self-report measures of knowledge, self-efficacy, positive and negative outcome expectancies, and hypoglycaemic worries at baseline (N=47) and the end of the course (N=42). In two additional centres, participants completed these and other measures assessing self-management behaviours, cognitive adaptation to diabetes and diabetes distress at baseline (N=32), the end of the course (N=27) and three-month follow-up (N = 27). HbA1c levels were recorded at baseline (N=79), six (N=77) and 12 (N=65) months.

Results. There were statistically significant increases in self-report knowledge, self-efficacy, positive outcome expectancies, and self-management behaviours, and a statistically significant decrease in negative outcome expectancies, between baseline and the end of the course. There were also statistically significant increases in self-report knowledge, self-efficacy, self-management behaviours and cognitive adaptation to diabetes between baseline and 3-month follow-up. Compared with baseline, HbA1c levels decreased by 5.44 mmol/mol (0.48%) at 6 months (P=0.019, SD=19.93), and by 5.98 mmol/mol (0.54%) at 12 months (P=0.043, SD=23.32).

Discussion. The results indicate the potential benefits of a self-management course designed to address developmental needs and challenges faced by young people with type 1 diabetes. Further studies with larger numbers and appropriate controls are required to confirm these initial findings.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: A300 Clinical Medicine
B400 Nutrition
Department: Faculties > Health and Life Sciences > Social Work, Education and Community Wellbeing
Depositing User: Paul Burns
Date Deposited: 13 Jun 2019 11:17
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2019 16:20
URI: http://nrl.northumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/39669

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